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TRAT

TRAT

Trat A small province at the eastern-most frontier bordering

on Cambodia with the Khao Banthat mountain range forming

a natural demarcation, Trat is a resort town with over fifty

large and small off -shore islands, long white sandy beaches

and unspoiled coral ranges. It is also a major fruit-growing

and fishing area.


TRAT

Thai Term Glossary

Amphoe : District

Ao : Bay

Ban : Village

Hat : Beach

Khao : Mountain

Ko : Island

Laem : Cape

Maenam : River

Mueang : Town or City

Muko : Group of Islands (Archipelago)

Namtok : Waterfall

Phu : Mountain

Pha : Cliff

Tambon : Sub-district

Tham : Cave

Ubosot or Bot : Ordination hall in a temple

Wihan : Image hall in a temple

Wat : Temple

Note : English spelling here given tries to approximate

Thai pronunciation. Posted signs may be spelled differently.

When seeking help from a Thai for direction, point to the Thai

spellings given after each place name.

Trat A small province at the eastern-most frontier bordering

on Cambodia with the Khao Banthat mountain range forming

a natural demarcation, Trat is a resort town with over fifty

large and small off -shore islands, long white sandy beaches

and unspoiled coral ranges. It is also a major fruit-growing

and fi shing area.

About 315 kilometres from Bangkok and covering an area

of 2,819 square kilometres, the province is administratively

divided into the districts of Mueang Trat, Khao Saming, Laem

Ngop, Khlong Yai and Bo Rai, and the sub-districts of Ko Chang

and Ko Kut.

History

Trat is a seaport mostly suitable for mooring ships, loading

goods, trade exchange, refilling food and freshwater for ships.

It is therefore a community site of Chinese merchants who

travelled to trade.

Trat was considered among the trade centre cities of Southeast

Asia in the late Ayutthaya period. A lot of goods that were

sent to sell overseas, especially forest things; such as, deer’s

horns, animal hides, scented wood, and spices, were brought

from the forest and mountainous zone of the eastern coast

including Rayong, Chanthaburi, and Trat. Such goods were

carried by river and along the Khao Saming Mountain to reach

the mouth of the Gulf of Trat.

In the independence war, King Taksin the Great chose Trat as

a bumper outpost to provide food for the troops before he

moved the naval army from Chanthaburi.

In the reign of King Rama I the Great, Trat was still an

important seaport, as it used to be in the Ayutthaya period.

During the reign of King Rama III, Thailand fought in a war

with Chao Anuwong, the ruler of Vientiane, who later took

sides with Vietnam. Thailand and Vietnam were in confl ict and

a war broke out in 1828. Trat was a site of gathering soldiers

and food, and a military fortress and camp was established at

Ban Laem Hin in the Gulf of Trat.

In the reign of King Rama V the Great, France sent its naval

troops to seize Chanthaburi in 1893 (Ro So 112), and returned

it to Thailand in 1904 in exchange for Trat, covering from Laem

Sing to Ko Kut, and Patchantakhirikhet (Ko Kong). Later, the

Thai government came to realise that Trat was of strategic

importance, and that most of the people there were Thai.

However, with the intelligence of King Rama V the Great, France

agreed to make a contract to return Trat and Dan Sai on the

right bank of the Mekong River (when facing the mouth of

the river) to Thailand in exchange for Battambong, Siem Reap,

and Sri Sophon, on 23 March, 1906. The handover ceremony

was performed by Phraya Maha Ammattayathipbodi, then

Phraya Si Thep who held the position of Palat Thunchalong or

Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Interior, as the head

of the delegation of the Thai government, and Monsieur

Rousseau Residant as the head of the delegation of the French

government at the Trat Provincial Hall, and the French troops

were withdrawn on 6 July, 1907.

During the Indochina War (1940-1941), France attempted to

seize Trat again on 17 January, 1941, but the Thai navy fought

back courageously to successfully save this strategic city of

abundance.

In 1978, there was a war in Cambodia, and a hundred thousand

Khmers fled for their lives into Thailand through the Banthat

Mountain Range, an eastern border. Highway 318 running

parallel with the Banthat Mountain Range and the coastal line

towards Amphoe Khlong Yai became a main strategic route. The

war continued until 1986. After that, the path was transformed

into a border trade route between Cambodia and Thailand, with

the Hat Lek Border Market ending the boundary of Thailand

and marking the starting point of travel to Ko Kong.

The discovery of “red gems” or “Siamese rubies” in the area

of Amphoe Bo Rai in 1971 caused a gems fever and people

from all walks of life flocked here to try their luck. Prosperity

in all aspects happened in Bo Rai and made it a big city being

developed alongside with the town of Trat. Its former dense

forest area became pitted, and when all precious stones were

gone in 1991, Bo Rai was left a deserted city with only shops and

buildings as a reminder of its fl ourishing economy in the past.

BOUNDARIES

 North Chanthaburi and the Kingdom of Cambodia

 South The Gulf of Thailand

 East The Kingdom of Cambodia, bordered by the

 Banthat Mountains

 West Chanthaburi, bordered by the Welu River

HOW TO GET THERE

By Car : From Bangkok, take one of these three routes:

1. Motorway : Start at Km 0 at the Sri Nagarind-Ramkhamhaeng

Intersection and drive onto the route Ban Bueng-KlaengChanthaburi-Trat, 

a total distance of approximately 315 Kilometres

2. Bang Na-Chon Buri-Klaeng-Chanthaburi-Trat (Highway 344),

a distance of approximately 318 Kilometres

3. Bang Na-Trat (Highway 3) passing Chon Buri-RayongChanthaburi-Trat, 

a total distance of approximately 385 Kilometres

By Bus : Bangkok (Ekkamai) Bus Terminal on Sukhumvit Road

An air-conditioned bus, First Class (Po. 1), takes about 5 hours.

The privately-owned bus operators include :

Cherdchai Tour Company Limited, Bangkok Offi ce Tel. 0 2391

2237, 0 2391 2804, Trat Offi ce Tel. 0 3951 1062.

Transport 99 Company Limited, Bangkok Offi ce Tel. 0 2537

0291 or Hotline Tel. 1409, Trat Offi ce Tel. 0 3951 1986.

For a non air-conditioned bus service : contact the Public

Relations Offi ce of the Bangkok (Ekkamai) Bus Terminal on

Sukhumvit Road at Tel. 0 2391 2504, 0 2391 4164.

Bangkok (Chatuchak) Bus Terminal on Kamphaeng Phet 2 Road

An air-conditioned bus, First Class (Po. 1), takes about 5 hours.

The privately-owned bus operators include :

Cherdchai Tour Company Limited, Bangkok Offi ce Tel. 0 2391

2237, 0 2391 2804, Trat Offi ce Tel. 0 3951 1062.

Transport 99 Company Limited, Bangkok Offi ce Tel. 0 2537

0291 or Hotline Tel. 1409, Trat Offi ce Tel. 0 3951 1986.

Thana Kawi Transport Company Limited, Bangkok Offi ce Tel.

0 2936 3939, Trat Offi ce Tel. 0 3952 5222.

By Commuter Van : There is a daily commuter van service

from Victory Monument (Pong Lee Restaurant Side) and the

Bangkok (Chatuchak) Bus Terminal on Kamphaeng Phet 2

Road during 05.00 a.m. - 07.00 p.m. It takes around 4 hours.

For further details, contact Tel. 08 7835 7056.

By Plane : The Bangkok Aviation Public Company Limited

off ers daily fl ights between Bangkok and Trat. For further

details, contact the Bangkok Office Tel. 0 2270 6699 or

Hotline Tel. 1771, Trat Offi ce Tel. 0 3952 5767-8, or visit the

website : www.bangkokair.com. In Trat, the airport is located

in Amphoe Khao Saming. A shuttle bus service operated by

the Bangkok Limousine Company Limited is available for

tourists from the airport to the ferry pier to Ko Chang. For

further details, contact Tel. 0 3952 5776, 08 6563 8889.

See Details...
https://goo.gl/maps/FqQpLPgPp2nszcLM6

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